RPGChat – Modern Firearms Guide (Part 1: QA)

RPGChat
“You can get more of what you want with a kind word and a gun than you can with just a kind word.”

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Table of Contents
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1. Q/A
2. Revolvers
3. Pistols (Semi-Automatic) [to come]
4. Rifles (Bolt action, Single-Action, High-Velocity) [to come]
5. Scopes and Equipment [to come]
6. Ammunition types [to come]
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Firearms, since their creation, have changed the lives of humanity. War, security, and crime will never be as they were. Whether moral or corrupt, a gun is commonplace in the household of man. A gun is often coined as The Great Equalizer and has secured itself a spot in Roleplay, especially in the Modern/Futuristic Genre. Whether the user is strong or weak, big or small, a gun gives the character control over life and death to a degree never seen before.

I’ll start this off with a few questions and answers.

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1. Q/A
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Q: What exactly is a firearm?

A: The dictionary defines a firearm as being, “a small arms weapon, as a rifle or pistol, from which a projectile is fired by gunpowder.” Many people, however, would consider a crossbow as falling into the category of firearms despite it lacking gunpowder. The projectile that a firearm fires is known as ammunition and comes in the form of a bullet or round.

Q: What is the difference between a Rifle and a Pistol?

A: A rifle is defined as, “a shoulder firearm with spiral grooves cut in the inner surface of the gun barrel to give the bullet a rotatory motion and thus a more precise trajectory” while a pistol is defined as, “a short firearm intended to be held and fired with one hand.” Generally, a rifle is capable of firing a much larger caliper of round than a pistol (although this isn’t always true in the case of such things as a .22LR round for a rifle and .45 magnum for a revolver). The general rule of thumb when deciding whether your character is using a rifle or a pistol is this: “If it’s braced against the shoulder and fired with two hands, it’s generally a rifle. If it’s held with one hand it’s generally a pistol.” Do know that there are exceptions to these rules (I.E. A Shotgun and a machined pistol).

Q: You mentioned Revolver, isn’t it a pistol?

A: Yes and no. A Revolver falls into the pistol category, yes, but it is an entirely different animal. It’s defined as, “a handgun having a revolving chambered cylinder for holding a number of cartridges, which may be discharged in succession without reloading.” Essentially, instead of using a magazine (the device that holds and feeds the rounds into a pistol) a revolver uses a rotating cylinder that is attached between the hammer and the barrel. Revolver’s generally hold 6 rounds and are less prone to misfires compared to semi-automatic pistols and tend to have a higher accuracy and ease of cleaning, however it suffers in round capacity (6 round maximum compared to the 5-10 rounds that a semi-auto pistol can carry).

Q: Single shot? Semi-Automatic? Fully Automatic?

A: Simply speaking, a Single Shot weapon must have the hammer pulled back after each shot before another shot can be made. A semi automatic requires that you pull the trigger for each shot fired but doesn’t require ‘cocking’ the weapon and a Fully Automatic Weapon simply requires that you hold the trigger down and it will continue to fire until it overheats, warps the barrel, or runs out of ammunition. Most fully automatic weapons come in the form of Machine Guns such as the M2 Browning .50 Caliber or the M240, Sub-machine Guns (such as the MP40) are often Fully Auto as well and Machine Pistols (the Uzi being one of the most famous and recognizable) are often thrown in and confused with SMGs. Most Fully Automatic weapons have a Semi-Automatic function that can be switched to for accuracy and ammo conservation.

One thought on “RPGChat – Modern Firearms Guide (Part 1: QA)

  1. Pingback: RPGChat – Modern Firearms Guide (Part 2: Revolvers) | RPGChat

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